Using the ZIP UP energy exercise

 

We can all feel the exposed or affected by other people’s negative energy from time to time. Energetically we can be  unprotected leaving us too open to other people’s thoughts and feelings, as well as your own. A meridian energy exercise which stimulates our Central Meridian enhances our body’s natural way to protect ourselves. The ‘Zipping Up” from the pubic bone to the lower lip strengthens this Meridian.  By tracing the energy flowing through the meridian allows you to feel more confident, more positive, more centred, to think more clearly, and protects your system from negative energies.

You can do the zip up as part of your daily routine (eg morning) and as often as you wish throughout the day. It’s a great technique to use when feeling sensitive to threat or in any social situation or other people’s energies.

  1. To begin, briskly tap (7 –10 times) on the end points of your collarbones (this is the K27 points on the kidney meridians) to ensure that energy in your meridians is moving in a forward direction. 
  2. Rub the palms of your hands together in a circular direction.  
  3. Place both hands, palms facing the body, at the start of the central meridian, which is at your pubic bone. Inhale deeply as you pull your hands slowly and firmly straight up the centre of your body to meet your lower lip, where the meridian ends. Imagine pulling up a zip to close it. 
  4. As you exhale firstly bring your hands past your lips and extend your arms up to the sky, connecting your central meridian with your aura and energy beyond you and then arc your arms and hands sideways and down returning your hands to the starting position.  
  5. Repeat steps 1-4 twice more.

Saying affirmations while doing this exercise is extremely powerful. While you zip up, it may be helpful to say “I am clear, centred, and confident” or something else that will help become more confident in your specific situation. Also imagine that you are locking the zipper in place after you are done and hiding the key to prolong the technique’s effect.

 

Adapted From: Energy Medicine by Donna Eden

 

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Wired for independence and exploration 

Remembering some of the decisions we made as teenagers can make us cringe. Neuroscientist Adriane Galvan is exploring that some of the most puzzling teenage behaviour may have some real benefits. In her UCLA lab, she uses a combination of behavioural techniques and neuroimaging to reveal the fascinating connections between brain development and behaviour. Offering teens the stimulation that suits their current needs provides more effective and healthier outcomes for all.

Why the teenage brain has an evolutionary advantage

Remembering the decisions we made as teens can often make us cringe. But neuroscientist Adriana Galván is learning that some of the most puzzling teenager behavior may actually have some real benefits. In her UCLA lab, she uses a combination of behavioral techniques and neuroimaging to reveal the fascinating connections between brain development and behavior.

Posted by UCLA on Friday, 8 December 2017

 

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Journal of Holistic Nursing: Vol 20 Issue 10

EFT becomes an efficacious tool in the hands of nurses who are seeking whole person approaches for the healing of a wide variety of psychological and physical conditions.

The Emotional Freedom Technique Finally, a Unifying Theory for the Practice of Holistic Nursing, or Too Good to Be True?

Patrice Rancour, MS, RN, PMHCNS-BC

Integrative Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is defined and described as a clinical procedure for the relief of psychological and physical distress that patients often bring to the attention of nurses. Frequently referred to as “tapping,” this technique combines the cognitive reprocessing benefits of exposure and acceptance therapy with the energetic disturbance releases associated with acupuncture and other energy therapies. More than 60 research articles in peer-reviewed journals report a staggering 98% efficacy rate with the use of this procedure from psychological distress (posttraumatic stress disorder, phobias, anxiety, depression, etc.) to physical conditions (asthma, fibromyalgia, pain, seizure disorders, etc.) to performance issues (athletic, academic). Perhaps because of this, this technique has encountered a fair degree of skepticism within the health care community. Easily taught as a self-help aid that patients can administer to themselves, EFT becomes an efficacious tool in the hands of nurses who are seeking whole person approaches for the healing of a wide variety of psychological and physical conditions. A conceptual framework, mechanisms of action, evidence of safety, literature review, and case studies are also included.

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Above the Moon Productions was launched this year by a group of budding young creatives, to produce drama that challenges attitudes towards anxiety, depression and mood swings.

Happy Yet? is a dark comedy set in Stockholm that offers a fresh take on depression and mood disorders. Showcased at Edinburgh’s 2016 Fringe, with 4 stars from The List, the play combines elements of Nordic drama and farce to tackle the stigma surrounding mental illness.

Read full information here
http://www.thecourtyard.org.uk/whatson/969/happy-yet

Book tickets

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The human brain is capable of incredible things, but it’s also extremely flawed at times.

Science has shown that we tend to make all sorts of mental mistakes, called “cognitive biases”, that can affect both our thinking and actions. These biases can lead to us extrapolating information from the wrong sources, seeking to confirm existing beliefs, or failing to remember events the way they actually happened!

To be sure, this is all part of being human – but such cognitive biases can also have a profound effect on all aspects of al life. This infographic from DesignHacks.co shows and groups each of the 188 known confirmation biases in existence.

What is a Cognitive Bias?

Humans tend to think in certain ways that can lead to systematic deviations from making rational judgments.

These tendencies usually arise from:
•Information processing shortcuts
•The limited processing ability of the brain
•Emotional and moral motivations
•Distortions in storing and retrieving memories
•Social influence

Cognitive biases have been studied for decades by academics in the fields of cognitive science, social psychology, and behavioural economics, but they are especially relevant in today’s information-packed world. They influence the way we think and act, and such irrational mental shortcuts can lead to all kinds of problems in entrepreneurship, investing, or management.

Cognitive Bias Examples

Here are four examples of how these types of biases can affect people in the business world:

Familiarity Bias: An investor puts her money in “what she knows”, rather than seeking the obvious benefits from portfolio diversification. Just because a certain type of industry or security is familiar doesn’t make it the logical selection.

Self-Attribution Bias: An entrepreneur overly attributes his company’s success to himself, rather than other factors (team, luck, industry trends). When things go bad, he blames these external factors for derailing his progress.

Anchoring Bias: An employee in a salary negotiation is too dependent on the first number mentioned in the negotiations, rather than rationally examining a range of options.

Survivorship Bias: Entrepreneurship looks easy, because there are so many successful entrepreneurs out there. However, this is a cognitive bias: the successful entrepreneurs are the ones still around, while the millions who failed went and did other things.

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“The blend of information and support has helped me manage my mental health, and motivated me to become a Mental Health First Aid instructor. I now manage other people’s reactions to my panic attacks more effectively as a result of the training.” Mental Health First Aid training doesn’t teach you to be a therapist, but it does teach you to listen, reassure and respond. Beth has found MHFA training helped her to manage her own mental health better, as a result of the broad range of topics covered in the training.
Book your MHFA course with Positive Energy Being today.

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